Posted on

Have You Ever Had Pain in Your Tooth…But You Are Not Even Sure Which Tooth It Is?

Sable DDS sore teeth

Does that make you feel crazy?  Well…you aren’t! There are actually several reasons why it can be difficult to pinpoint the origin of tooth pain.

Let’s take a step back and consider some of the possible reasons. Tooth decay can cause bacteria to infect the interior of the tooth and then trigger pain from changes in temperature or pressure.  This pain is coming from the nerve, but those nerves aren’t tied to one specific tooth. Therefore, it can feel like the pain is coming from a group of teeth or even from the sinus area. (who knew??) This type of pain may decrease over time, even without treatment, but the problem is simply hiding in the wings… and can lead to a root canal and eventually to gum disease.

Going the other direction, gum disease can lead to root canal infection.  Common periodontal disease caused by plaque along the gum line can lead to inflammation and infection of the gums.  The gum can then begin to detach from the tooth surface and form a “pocket.” As this worsens, the infection can spread to the root of a tooth and then into the tissue inside the tooth.   The resulting pain may feel like gum and tooth pain.  Since some of these roots can be in the proximity of roots of other teeth, the infection and pain can spread to nearby teeth and gum area.

THEN to confuse matters even more, a broken tooth can cause tooth AND gum pain depending on the location of the fracture in the tooth.

So, clear as mud??  We tried to simplify this as much as possible, but we also recognize that not every dental case fits carefully into one bucket. That is why we are here to help figure it out.   If you are experiencing tooth or gum pain, give us a call; we can work together to figure out what exactly is happening and create a treatment plan to make you feel better.

So, there…all better?

(Source:  Dear Doctor Dentistry & Oral Health, Issue 20)

Posted on

All You Ever Wanted to Know About What is Really Inside Your Tooth…

Sable DDS Layers of a tooth

Knowing the PARTS OF YOUR TOOTH will help you understand better how to care for your teeth and help those in your family too!

The part of your tooth that you see is Enamel.  Enamel is the strong outer layer and is actually the hardest

Coronal section of tooth in jawbone

substance in your body.  WOW! What a crazy thought!  The Enamel protects the rest of your tooth.  This is why you definitely don’t want it to be damaged – like yucky cavities.

Dentin is the next section inside your tooth, a bone-like layer that contains some of your tooth’s nerves. Good thing your tooth can’t have a nervous breakdown!

The innermost section of your tooth is its Pulpnot like the stringy weird stuff in orange juice.  Pulp contains various blood vessels, white blood cells, and nerves. If decay or disease causes your Pulp to become infected or inflamed (bummer), you’ll need Root Canal therapy to remove it.

Root Canal therapy consists of opening the tooth, removing the diseased or dead pulp tissue, cleaning, sterilizing, filling and then sealing the root canals. Root Canal therapy is like taking the wick out of a candle.  The tooth remains very much alive after endodontic therapy, because its living root surfaces are nourished by the adjacent tissues of the gums and jaw. Only the interior of the tooth loses living tissue with Root Canal treatment.

So that is our quick and clean description of “What Is Inside Your Tooth”!