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To Add Insult to Cold Weather – It Can Be Rough on Your Mouth!

Sable DDS Nutcracker

Question:  “Can cold weather really affect my teeth?”

Answer: Yes! Here are a few things to look out for as the weather turns cold!

  1. Dry Mouth – The winter means that your body in general will be more dry than in the summer. It doesn’t help that you may have the heat on for most of the day, which makes your nose, throat, mouth, skin, etc. very dry. To battle cotton mouth, drink more water and try to stay away from consuming a lot of alcohol and caffeine. A humidifier can also help combat the dryness.
  2. Sensitive Teeth – Remember that time you had a cold beverage or a spoonful of ice cream and you shivered right to the core? Cold air can have the same effect and make your teeth feel more sensitive. Try using a toothpaste that is geared towards sensitive teeth and make an appointment with to see us if it gets worse over time. The cold wind might be exposing a cavity you didn’t realize you had before.
  3. Cold Sores – Having chapped lips aren’t the same thing as having cold sores, however they do have at least one thing in common; they’re more prevalent in the winter. Cold sores can be triggered by stress, hormones or extreme tiredness. To prevent cold sores your overall health has to be good. You can try to shield your face from the wind with scarves or turtlenecks and chapstick. Also the less you touch your cold sores, the faster they will heal.
  4. Infection – Your gums are at a higher risk for infection because your body generally has to work harder to stay healthier in the cold weather. With your immune system being barraged left and right with flus, colds, and general aches and pains due to the cold, your mouth may not have the protection it needs to keep an infection from setting in. The best way to protect yourself is to keep your teeth and general oral hygiene as clean as possible so that bacteria doesn’t have a chance.
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All You Ever Wanted to Know About What is Really Inside Your Tooth…

Sable DDS Layers of a tooth

Knowing the PARTS OF YOUR TOOTH will help you understand better how to care for your teeth and help those in your family too!

The part of your tooth that you see is Enamel.  Enamel is the strong outer layer and is actually the hardest

Coronal section of tooth in jawbone

substance in your body.  WOW! What a crazy thought!  The Enamel protects the rest of your tooth.  This is why you definitely don’t want it to be damaged – like yucky cavities.

Dentin is the next section inside your tooth, a bone-like layer that contains some of your tooth’s nerves. Good thing your tooth can’t have a nervous breakdown!

The innermost section of your tooth is its Pulpnot like the stringy weird stuff in orange juice.  Pulp contains various blood vessels, white blood cells, and nerves. If decay or disease causes your Pulp to become infected or inflamed (bummer), you’ll need Root Canal therapy to remove it.

Root Canal therapy consists of opening the tooth, removing the diseased or dead pulp tissue, cleaning, sterilizing, filling and then sealing the root canals. Root Canal therapy is like taking the wick out of a candle.  The tooth remains very much alive after endodontic therapy, because its living root surfaces are nourished by the adjacent tissues of the gums and jaw. Only the interior of the tooth loses living tissue with Root Canal treatment.

So that is our quick and clean description of “What Is Inside Your Tooth”!